Category Archives: corruption

Americans Quaver As U.S. Prepares To Go Titanic

Lifeboats for senators and bankers only.

Fidelity, which never sends emails, except to market its herd-investing strategies, has suddenly sputtered to life.

This weekend’s missive: “Debt ceiling: what you should know.”

Really. It’s a little late to be sending this now. But what have you got?

It turns out Fidelity is able to direct me to its Web site to get the most clicking, ahem, “best thinking” of its market specialists, who have penned such helpful tidbits as “Inside the U.S. debt drama” and “Fear is not a strategy.”

Fidelity, we know you don’t want us pulling all our money out of our shrinking retirement accounts and stuffing it under our mattresses because that is not good for you. But “Fear is not a strategy”? Come on. That’s pitiful.

We are going down this road no matter what we do now. We’ve heard for a long time something’s gotta’ give. It is just too bad so many people are going to get a lot worse than they deserve.

Just a few letters from the Interblogging universe, written by concerned Americans who now believe their worries will be given more consideration online than by their own congressmen and women… Continue reading Americans Quaver As U.S. Prepares To Go Titanic

Trader Threatens To ‘Kill’ 47 U.S. Officials

‘I was being sued…it upset me.’

A midlife crisis can take many forms. Cheating on your spouse. Purchasing a Maserati. Wearing Billabong. Buying into The Lynx Effect. Just being a jerk. But putting up an “execution” list on your Web site of high-ranking financial and government officials and urging people to buy guns to help you kill them is one I haven’t heard of. Among those on the hit list of the smiling man in the orange tie to your left: the head of the Securities and Exchange Commission Mary Schapiro and the chairman of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission Gary Gensler — both heavyweight Wall Street watchdogs.

“Go buy a gun, and let’s get to work in taking back our country from these criminals,” he wrote on his site, according to prosecutors. “I will be the first one to lead by example.”

The 50-year-old from Long Island is accused of threatening the lives of 47 current and former officials. (Yes, I said 47. You cannot make this stuff up.) Continue reading Trader Threatens To ‘Kill’ 47 U.S. Officials

Oh Roop, It Didn’t Have To Be This Way

In happier days...

I remember when I first read about Rupert Murdoch as a kid, how he barnstormed the British media in the 1960s and published anything that might put the nation’s panties in a bunch: its journalistic establishment, its finance establishment, its trade union establishment, its royal establishment. You name it, if it was a pillar of something-or-other, he wanted to chop it down. Then I learned about his blackheartedness, his don’t give a damn attitude and total lack of self-awareness and accountability. God help me, I thought, I love a psychotic.

While I worked at Dow Jones, we all watched as Rupert Murdoch outfoxed the utterly dundering Bancroft family, owners of The Wall Street Journal. Somehow he managed it so that the family’s only representative on the board was a 27-year-old aspiring opera singer. Even then I reckoned, well, if the family that owns this paper doesn’t realize what a jewel it has, maybe they don’t deserve to own it.

We were also sick of the Bancrofts doing things like selling off all their Dow Jones stock while insisting on keeping their controlling power. It seemed dysfunctional and cheap. Despite his faults, Murdoch was never cheap with the paper — in fact, he’s been spending on it  like a drunken sailor — and he seemed to genuinely love and covet it. With Murdoch, coveting is the most you can ask for.

Since then, many have left the Journal, as not everyone favors Murdoch’s rarefied brand of journalism. And while he used to go after the establishment, it seems now what he has always desired was to become the establishment. Continue reading Oh Roop, It Didn’t Have To Be This Way

How Now, Gold Cow?

So, I wrote a book…but I have not been goodly enough to do much blogging about it. This was not intentional. This was mainly because of the furious pace of travel, lawsuits, the odd threat — and the fact that I was serving full time as a journalism fellow at the University of Colorado at Boulder, trying to do my best to live a quiet life. I have since made amends, and will be writing regularly about my continuing fascination with sins of affinity and cultures of corruption. Healthy stuff like that.

Let’s start today with Goldman Sachs letting us all know that oil supply is headed for levels that are “critically tight,” sending prices in the U.S. up to nearly $100 again and in Europe still higher. This contrasts somewhat with the bank’s remarks in April that “supply-demand fundamentals are significantly less tight,” made by the bank’s chief energy analyst David Greely. At the time, this prodded oil prices into a temporary swan dive that proved a good buying opportunity for — some would say — Goldman. Mind you, oil supplies in the U.S. have been near their upper limits for most of the year, so not sure what the rumpus is about.

By May, however, Goldman pulled an about-face with its global head of commodities strategy, Jeffrey Currie, predicting that the loss of oil production due to the conflict in Libya would cause oil prices to surge. On cue, they did. Never mind that the Libyan conflict began in February, raging throughout Goldman’s projection of a price crash. Or that Libyan oil production has been a tiny drop in the global bucket (1.6 million barrels a day to the 20 million-plus a day consumed by the U.S. alone).

All told, Goldman’s prediction came just a few weeks after the bank told its clients to dump their oil investments. It makes one wonder which bank doubling as the world’s largest commodities trader was buying oil during that time? Continue reading How Now, Gold Cow?

Interview on ‘Keiser Report’ – Russia Today

Many of you have written to ask for a good bit more on the shenanigans prevalent in today’s oil market. Check out this show, aired today, from minute 14 on…(Thankfully, you can scroll through to the juicy stuff.) More to come on DOJ, FTC, CFTC and FERC investigations into the price of oil and gas — and where the biggest challenges lie for those who seek to break the back of the corruption.

 

‘The Asylum,’ Or How Capitalism and the American Dream Met Their Deaths

June 2011  by Rogue Philosopher

The Asylum: The Renegades Who Hijacked the World’s Oil Market by Leah McGrath Goodman details how a handful of commodity traders on the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) manipulated the energy futures markets and thereby did more than their share to destroy to our economy.

A singular tragedy in this sordid tale is how the commodity markets finally succumbed to the unbridled greed and power lust that characterized the rest of Wall Street. The commodity futures markets were always the bad boys of the financial community. They didn’t play by the stuff-shirt, pinstriped rules of the banks and investment community. The players on the NYSE and AMEX were mostly dullards. By contrast, the boys and gals at the Commodity Exchange Center in the World Trade Center were a colorful, indeed, even charismatic lot.  The traders were outcasts, renegades, cowboys. They stood apart from the financial herd. They drank hard, partied hard, and womanized shamelessly.

In short, they were a lot of fun.

The commodity futures markets were also the one last place in the financial community where someone starting out from humble beginnings and without the advantages of social or political connections could, with some assistance from Lady Fortuna, make it big. Or at least make a real good living for himself and his family. Traders like these represented one of the few remaining symbols of the American Dream.

No more…

Continue reading ‘The Asylum,’ Or How Capitalism and the American Dream Met Their Deaths

How Fear, Greed Factor Into the Price of Gasoline

The price of oil is set not in Vienna at the headquarters of OPEC, but at the New York Mercantile Exchange.

Llewellyn King, PBS

Sunday, May 1, 2011

WASHINGTON — The fate of the Obama presidency hangs not on a birth certificate or the red ink on the federal budget but by the hose nozzle of your local gas station.

Electoral discontent is measured by the price of a gallon of gasoline. Heading past $4 toward $5, that is a lethal trajectory for President Obama.

Enter the demagogues, especially the clown-in-a-business-suit, Donald Trump. Unfettered by the gravity that goes with facts, Trump says that he would fix the oil price — now around $110 a barrel — by facing down the producers, particularly the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC). He told an interviewer on television that he would call OPEC and tell them to pump more or face the consequences. The latter, he did not specify. War? Against whom?

In a compelling book by Leah McGrath Goodman, The Asylum: The Renegades Who Hijacked the World’s Oil Market, the author lays out the ugly fact that often — in fact, more often as not — the price of oil is set not in Vienna at the headquarters of OPEC, but in downtown Manhattan at the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX).

Tens of thousands of future contracts are traded in nanoseconds at the NYMEX, and the price of oil is set. This price affects not only the price that will be paid when these contracts expire and delivery takes place, but also, according to Goodman, the all-important over-the-counter market, where sellers trade more directly with buyers without government oversight.

Goodman contends that there is little oversight of the NYMEX because the agency charged with the role is the weak and ineffectual Commodities Futures Trading Commission (CFTC), where many staff and commissioners are busy burnishing their resumes so they can cash in later as market executives.

The over-the-counter market is not regulated at all because of a pernicious interference from Congress known as the “Enron Loophole.” How did it get into law? It is one of those pieces of special-interest protection that owes its existence to legislative immaculate conception. It was not in the committee version of the bill; it slipped in along the way without parenthood, but is largely believed to be the work of former Sen. Phil Graham, R-Texas, whose wife, Wendy, was chair of the CFTC.

In classic theory, a market is where a willing buyer and a willing seller strike a price. In the world of traders, it is something else: It is where volatility is rewarded and myths hold sway.

Today there is no actual shortage of crude oil. Supply and demand, according to those who monitor these things, is in balance. But fear stalks the trading floors because fear is good for traders; and fear is a critical part of the oil price. Continue reading How Fear, Greed Factor Into the Price of Gasoline

Quote from a great piece in this month’s Vanity Fair, penned by the illustrious Mr. S…

“Much of today’s inequality is due to manipulation of the financial system, enabled by changes in the rules that have been bought and paid for by the financial industry itself—one of its best investments ever. The government lent money to financial institutions at close to 0 percent interest and provided generous bailouts on favorable terms when all else failed. Regulators turned a blind eye to a lack of transparency and to conflicts of interest. When you look at the sheer volume of wealth controlled by the top 1 percent in this country, it’s tempting to see our growing inequality as a quintessentially American achievement—we started way behind the pack, but now we’re doing inequality on a world-class level. And it looks as if we’ll be building on this achievement for years to come, because what made it possible is self-reinforcing. Wealth begets power, which begets more wealth.”

– Joseph E. Stiglitz, economist and Nobel laureate

5 Shocking Gas Prices Around The Globe

Surprised by Gas Price of $4 a Gallon? Try $8.35 in Germany

By SUSANNA KIM

April 12, 2011

While American drivers are spooked by $4-per-gallon gasoline prices in the U.S., they may be shell-shocked on other continents like Europe. In London, gas was $8.17 per gallon in March, and in Istanbul, Turkey the price was $9.63, according to DailyFinance. 

Leah McGrath Goodman, author of “The Asylum: The Renegades Who Hijacked the World’s Oil Market,” said at least two factors contribute to the variance in global gas prices. First, countries that produce their own oil often have lower prices. Second, different governments choose to subsidize or tax citizens for purchasing gas.

“Every country is different, obviously,” Goodman said. “Some countries have amazing subsidies. In Libya, even with its conflict, its low price has a lot to do with the fact that the government can choose to charge people a lot less.”

Here are five national averages around the globe… Continue reading 5 Shocking Gas Prices Around The Globe

New Book Reveals Who Controls Global Oil Prices

By Tim O’Shei

HOUSTON BUSINESS JOURNAL | Friday, Apr 8th 2011

Who controls the global oil prices?

Powerful banks? Massive hedge funds? Big Oil? OPEC?

There’s never been a straight answer to that question – until now.

Leah McGrath Goodman, a former special writer and editor for The Wall Street Journal and 1998 graduate of St. Bonaventure University, spent the last seven years writing a book that reveals where oil prices have been set for decades: the New York Mercantile Exchange. Or, as the title of Goodman’s book calls it, “The Asylum.”

Published this year by William Morrow/HarperCollins, “The Asylum” takes readers into the boardroom and onto the trading floor of Nymex. Goodman paints a warts-and-all portrait of the often rough-edged traders, for whom she claims making or losing millions in a day was as commonplace as fistfights, drugs and pornography.

By executing both their own deals for oil contracts and orders from big banks and hedge funds, the Nymex traders set the benchmark for global oil pricing. They still do, though Nymex is now part of a group that includes its former competitor, the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, and most of the trading action happens online rather than on the floor.

Business First Managing Editor Tim O’Shei, a classmate of Goodman’s at St. Bonaventure, recently talked to her about the book and about the oil market. Following is a truncated version of that conversation: Continue reading New Book Reveals Who Controls Global Oil Prices